SPEED SKATERS
ELECTED TO THE SPEEDSKATING HALL OF FAME
Listed in the order in which they were inducted
Joseph Donoghue
John S. Johnson
Art Staff 
Edmund Lamy
Roy Mcwhirter
Everett Mcgowan
Jack Shea
Morris Wood
Valentine Bialas
Charles Jewtraw
Ben O'Sickey
Bobby Mclean
Joe Moore
Kit Klein
John Nilssen
Norval Baptie
Harley Davidson
Dorothy Franey Langkop
Madeline "Maddy" Horn
Harry Kaad
Charles T. Fisher
Irving Jaffee
Allan Potts
Kenneth Bartholomew
Leo Freisinger
Elsie Muller Mclave
Loretta Neitzel
Edward Schroeder
Ray Blum
Patricia Gibson Marshall
Delbert Lamb
Carmelita Landry Bernard
John Werket
J. O'neil Farrell
William D. Disney
Mary Novak Sand
Edgar J. Dame, Jr
Robert "Bob" Fitzgerald
Jeanne Ashworth Walker
Barbara Marchetti De Schepper
Don Mcdermott
Richard "Terry" Mcdermott
Elaine Bodga Gordon
Kenneth B. Lebel
Mary Meyers Rothstein
Edward L. Murphy
Lorraine Sabbe
James Campbell
Jeanne Omelenchuk
Dr. Michael P. Passarella
John Wurster
Dianne Holum
Pete Cefalu
Daniel J. Immerfall
Michel Conroy
Leah Poulos Mueller
Peter A. Mueller
Celeste Chlapaty Schultz
Eric Arthur Heiden
Beth Heiden
Diane L. (White) Wynne
Alan Rattray
Richard Wurster
Peggy Hartrich Clarke
William T. Lanigan
Kim Kostron Nyquist
Chuck Burke
Liza Merrifield Dennehy
Mary Blair Polaski
Michael Woods
Erik Henriksen
Dan Jansen
Tom Plant
Patrick Wentland
Bonnie Blair Cruikshank
Brian Arseneau
Andy Gabel
Cathy Turner
Eric Flaim
Kristen Talbot
Daniel Carroll
Nick Thometz
Amy Peterson
Edward Rudolph, Jr.
Nancy Swider-Peltz, Sr.
David Cruikshank
Floyd Bedbury
Connie Carpenter Phinney
Arnold Uhrlass
Katie Class Marquard
Mario Trafeli
Stephen S. Stenson
Casey Fitzrandolph
Rusty Smith
Scott Drebes

Click on a name above for more details of each person.

SPEED SKATERS
JOSEPH DONOGHUE  Born February 11, 1871.  Died 1921.  Elected to Hall of Fame May 14, 1960 at Colorado Springs, Colorado.  First American World Champion.  Reached his peak in 1893.  Submitted by the Middle Atlantic Association and John T. Egan.

JOHN S. JOHNSON  Born May 11, 1873.  Died 1934.  Elected to Hall of Fame May 14, 1960 at Colorado Springs, Colorado.  World Champion.  Reached his peak in 1908.  Submitted by the Minnesota Association and Mrs. Mary Danielson.

ART STAFF  Born February 4, 1897.  World Champion.  Peak in 1917.  Elected May 20, 1961 at Minneapolis, Minnesota.  Submitted by Richard P. McCarter and Amateur Skating Association of Illinois.

EDMUND LAMY  Born January 18, 1891.  Died September 8, 1962.  Elected May 20, 1961 at Minneapolis, Minnesota.  International Champion.  Submitted by Northern New York Association and Eugene Lynch.

ROY McWHIRTER  Born August 2, 1895.  International Champion.  Elected May 20, 1961 at Minneapolis, Minnesota.  Submitted by Richard P. McCarter and Amateur Skating Association of Illinois.

EVERETT McGOWAN  Born 1901.  International Champion.  Peak in 1921.  Elected May 19, 1962 at Colorado Springs, Colorado.  Submitted by the Eastern Minnesota Association and Clarice Mattson.

JACK SHEA  Born September 10, 1910.  International and Olympic Champion.  Peak in 1932.  Elected May 19, 1962 at Colorado Springs, Colorado.  Submitted by Northern New York Association and Eugene Lynch.  Sadly, Jack was killed by a drunk driver in Lake Placid on January 22, 2002.  He was 91 years old.

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MORRIS WOOD  Born January 28, 1882.  World Champion.  Peak in 1907.  Elected May 19, 1962 at Colorado Springs, Colorado.  Submitted by the Middle Atlantic Association and John T. Egan.

VALENTINE BIALAS  Born January 10, 1903.  International Champion.  Peak in 1928.  Elected May 11, 1963 at Chicago, Illinois.  Submitted by the Northern New York Association and Eugene Lynch.

CHARLES JEWTRAW  Born May 5, 1900.  Died January 26, 1996.  Olympic Champion.  Peak in 1924.  Elected May 11, 1963 at Chicago, Illinois.  Submitted by the Northern New York Association and Eugene Lynch.

BEN O'SICKEY  Born August 19, 1894.  National and International Champion.  Peak in 1916.  Elected May 11, 1963 at Chicago, Illinois.  Submitted by Jack Howlett.

BOBBY McLEAN  Born 1895.  World Champion.  Peak 1917.  Elected May 16, 1964 at Lake Placid, New York.  Submitted by the Amateur Skating Association of Illinois and Richard P. McCarter.

JOE MOORE  International Indoor Champion.  Peak 1924.  Elected May 16, 1964 at Lake Placid, New York.  Submitted by Middle Atlantic Association and John T. Egan.

KIT KLEIN  Born March 28, 1910.  Peak 1936.  Olympic and World Champion.  Elected May 16, 1964 at Lake Placid, New York.  Submitted by Western New York Association and Albert Abgott.

JOHN NILSSEN  Born July 8, 1877.  World Outdoor and Indoor Champion.  Peak 1900.  Elected May 15, 1965 at Milwaukee, Wisconsin.  Submitted by Dr. Milan Novak.

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NORVAL BAPTIE  Born 1885.  World Outdoor Champion.  Peak 1907.  Elected May 15, 1965 at Milwaukee, Wisconsin.  Submitted by Eastern Minnesota Association and Clarice Mattson.

HARLEY DAVIDSON  Born 1880.  U.S. Outdoor Champion 1910.  Peak 1910. Elected May 15, 1965 at Milwaukee, Wisconsin.  Submitted by Eastern Minnesota Association and Clarice Mattson.

DOROTHY FRANEY LANGKOP  Born 1915.  Died Jan. 11, 2011.  National Outdoor and North American Indoor Champion.  Peak 1936.  Elected May 15, 1966 at Colorado Springs, Colorado.  Submitted by Dr. Milan Novak.

MADELINE "MADDY" HORN  Born June 10, 1911.  National Outdoor and Indoor and North American Outdoor and Indoor Champion.  Peak 1939.  Elected May 14, 1966 at Colorado Springs, Colorado.  Submitted by Joe Heifert.

HARRY KAAD  Born 1888. Western and Illinois State Champion.  Peak 1914.  Elected May 14, 1966 at Colorado Springs, Colorado.  Submitted by the Amateur Skating Association of Illinois and Dr. Milan Novak.

CHARLES T. FISHER  Born 1886.  Western Indoor and Outdoor Champion.  Twelve times Wisconsin State Champion.  Peak in 1910.  Elected May 18, 1967 at Detroit, Michigan.  Submitted by Eugene McGrath.

IRVING JAFFEE  Born 1906.  Won two Olympic gold medals in 1932.  Set World's record in one mile in 1928.  Peak in 1932.  Elected May 18, 1967 at Detroit, Michigan.  Submitted by Eugene Lynch and Mildred Egan.

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ALLAN POTTS  Born 1904.  National Indoor and Outdoor Champion.  Member of U.S. Olympic teams.  Set World's record in 500 meters in 1936.  Elected May 18, 1967 at Detroit, Michigan.  Submitted by Mildred Egan.

KENNETH BARTHOLOMEW  Born February 10, 1920.  National Outdoor Champion 14 times.  Olympic medalist in 1948.  Peak 1956.  Elected May 18, 1968 at St. Louis, Missouri.  Submitted by Minnesota Association and L. F. Maday.

LEO FREISINGER  Born February 7, 1916.  National and North American Outdoor Champion.  Olympic medalist in 1936, coach of U.S. Team in 1964.  Peak 1940.  Elected May 18, 1968 at St. Louis, Missouri.  Submitted by Eugene McGrath.

ELSIE MULLER McLAVE  Born November 25, 1895.  National and North American Outdoor and Indoor Champion.  Peak 1931.  Elected May 18, 1968 at St. Louis, Missouri.  Submitted by Middle Atlantic Association and Mildred Egan.

LORETTA NEITZEL  Born February 11, 1908.   She died Aug 21, 2007, in Venice, Fl. at the age of 99.   National Outdoor and Indoor Champion.  Peak 1930.  Elected May 18, 1968 at St. Louis, Missouri.  Submitted by Roy Helminski and Eugene Lynch.

EDWARD SCHROEDER  Born 1911.  Member of 1932, 1936 and 1940 Olympic Teams, North American Outdoor Champion.  World medalist four times.  Olympic team coach in 1960.  Peak 1936.  In recent years Edward was able to continue to be a part of the Olympic movement by serving as an Olympic torchbearer for the Atlanta Summer Games and more recently the 2002 Salt Lake City Games.  Edward died December 1, 2005.  Elected May 18, 1968 at St. Louis, Missouri.  Submitted by Dr. Milan Novak.

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RAY BLUM  Born April 11, 1919.  National and North American Outdoor and Indoor Champion.  Peak 1952.  Elected May 17, 1969 at Anaheim, California.  Submitted by Mildred and John Egan.

PATRICIA GIBSON MARSHALL  Born January 2, 1935.  National Outdoor Champion 5 times.  Peak 1956.  Elected May 17, 1969 at Anaheim, California.  Submitted by Madison Skating Club and Wisconsin Association.

DELBERT LAMB  Born October 22, 1914.  Died September 25, 2010.  World 500 meter gold medalist.  Member of Olympic teams in 1936 and 1948.  Olympic Team Coach in 1956.  National referee.  Peak 1948.  Elected May 17, 1969 at Anaheim, California.  Submitted by Wisconsin Association and Eugene McGrath.

CARMELITA LANDRY BERNARD  Born July 1, 1917.  National and North American Outdoor Champion.  Peak 1942.  Elected May 17, 1969 at Anaheim, California.  Submitted by Eugene Lynch.

JOHN WERKET  Born 1924.  World gold medalist 4 times, silver medalist 4 times.  World team coach in 1967.  Peak 1950.  Elected May 17, 1969 at Anaheim, California.  Submitted by Clarice Mattson.

KEN HENRY  Born January 7, 1929.  Died March 1, 2009.  Member of 3 Olympic teams and coach in 1968.  Olympic gold medalist in 500 meter in 1952 and in World meets in 1949 and 1952.  Torch bearer for U.S. in 1960 Olympic Winter games.  Peak 1952.  Elected May 24, 1970 at Buffalo, New York.  Submitted by Dr. Milan Novak.

ARTHUR MATHEW LONGSJO  Born October 23, 1931.  Died September 16, 1958.  Cyclist and speed skater in Olympic games in 1956.  North American Outdoor Champion.  Peak 1956.  Elected May 24, 1970 at Buffalo, New York.  Submitted by Eugene Lynch and Northeastern Skating Association.

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GENE SANDVIG  Born February 8, 1931.  Member of 2 Olympic teams.  National and North American Outdoor Champion.  National official and active promoter.  Peak 1959.  Elected May 24, 1970 at Buffalo, New York.  Submitted by Mary Ossanna.

J. O'NEIL FARRELL  Born August 28, 1906.  Member of 2 Olympic teams and coach in 1936.  Bronze medalist in 1928 Olympic games.  National Outdoor Champion.  Peak 1928.  Elected May 16, 1971 at Lake Placid, New York.  Submitted by Edward Schroeder and the Amateur Skating Association of Illinois.

WILLIAM D. DISNEY  Born April 3, 1932.  Died April 22, 2009.  Member of Olympic team and Silver Medalist in 1960.  National and North American Indoor Champion, National official, promoter and team coach.  Peak 1960.  Elected May 16, 1971 at Lake Placid, New York.  Submitted by Larry Pearce and Southern California Skating Association.

MARY NOVAK SAND  Born February 17, 1939.  Eighteen times National and North American Outdoor and Indoor Champion.  Set 7 National outdoor and indoor records.  Organized and coached several new skating clubs.  Co-author of promotional literature and first skater to win National Outdoor Championship in all classes Midget through Senior.  Peak 1960.  Elected May 14, 1972 at Colorado Springs, Colorado.  Submitted by Eugene Lynch and John Egan, Jr.

EDGAR J. DAME, JR.  Born December 10, 1927.  North American Indoor Champion.  Set 7 National Indoor Records.  Peak 1953.  Elected May 14, 1972 at Colorado Springs, Colorado.  Submitted by Eugene Lynch.

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ROBERT "BOB" FITZGERALD  Born October 3, 1923.  National and North American Outdoor Champion.  Set 3 National Outdoor Records.  Member of 2 Olympic teams and silver medalist (tie) in 500 meters in 1948.  Peak 1948.  Elected May 4, 1974 at Bloomington, Minnesota.  Submitted by Mary Ossanna and Minnesota Skating Association.

JEANNE ASHWORTH WALKER  Born July 1, 1938.  Peak 1961.  Fourteen times National and North American Indoor and Outdoor Champion in the Senior Class.  Olympic bronze medalist in 500 meter in 1960.  Set 10 National Indoor records.  Elected May 3, 1975 at Madison, Wisconsin.  Submitted by Eugene Lynch and Northern New York Association.

BARBARA MARCHETTI DESCHEPPER  Born May 7, 1930.  Peak 1955.  Twelve times National and North American Outdoor and Indoor Champion in the Senior Class.  Set 5 National Indoor records.  Elected May 15, 1976 at Colorado Springs, Colorado.  Submitted by Dr. Milan Novak.

DON McDERMOTT  Born December 9, 1929.  Peak 1952.  Olympic silver medalist in 500 meter in 1952,  World's bronze medalist in 1955.  Flag bearer at Olympic games at Squaw Valley in 1960.  Elected May 15, 1976 at Colorado Springs, Colorado.  Submitted by Mildred Egan and the Middle Atlantic Association.

RICHARD "TERRY" McDERMOTT  Born September 20, 1940.  Peak 1964.  Olympic 500 meter gold medalist in 1964 and silver medalist in 1968.  National and North American Indoor Champion.  Set 2 National Outdoor records.  Promoter and officer in USISA.  Elected June 4, 1977 at Bay City, Michigan.  Submitted by Mike Sturm and the Michigan Association.

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ELAINE BODGA GORDON  Born November 17, 1917.  Died 2006.  Peak 1946.  National Outdoor and North American Indoor Champion.  Coached 12 skaters to National championships over a period of 30 years.  Elected May 20, 1978 at Oak Brook, Illinois.  Submitted by Jean Layton and the Amateur Skating Association of Illinois.

KENNETH B. LEBEL  Born July 26, 1937.  Peak 1956.  National and North American Indoor Champion and North American Outdoor Champion.  Set three National Indoor records.  Member of 1962 World Hockey Team.  Won four World Outdoor and three World Indoor Barrel Jumping Championships.  Elected May 19, 1979 at Saratoga Springs, New York.  Submitted by Eugene Lynch and Pat Peaslee.

MARY MEYERS ROTHSTEIN  Born February 10, 1946.  Peak 1964-68.  National Indoor and Outdoor Champion.  North American Outdoor Champion.  World Team member several times, winning gold medal in 500 meter in 1967.  Olympic 500 meter silver medalist in 1968.  Developer, coach and promoter of Northern Lights Association for novice skaters.  Elected May 17, 1980 in Bloomington, Minnesota.  Submitted by Clarice Mattson and Eastern Minnesota Skating Association.

EDWARD L. MURPHY  Born February 1, 1905.  Peak 1932.  Olympic team member in 1928 taking 5th in 1500 meter.  Olympic 5000 meter silver medalist in 1932.  Elected May 16, 1981 in Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

LORRAINE SABBE  Born 1927.  Died 1966.  Peak 1948-49.  Two times National Outdoor and North American Indoor Champion.  First woman to win both championships two years straight.  Set four North American Indoor records in 1949.  Officer of Michigan Skating Association.  Elected May 15, 1982 at Bloomington, Minnesota.  Submitted by Michigan Skating Association.

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JAMES CAMPBELL  Born June 6, 1930.  Died August 28, 2010.  Peak 1953-58.  Won National and North American Indoor and North American Outdoor Championships.  Set two National Indoor records.  As coach of the Glen Ellyn Club (1955-60) developed 5 National Champions, 3 North American Champions and a 1960 Olympic team member.  Elected May 14, 1983 at St. Louis, Missouri.  Submitted by Susan C. McLennand.

JEANNE OMELENCHUK  Born March 25, 1931.  Passed away June 2008.  Ten times National and North American Outdoor champion in the Senior Class (1957-1965); twice U.S. Open champion; four times U.S. World Team member; three times Olympic Team member (1960, 1968, 1972).  Set four National Outdoor Records.  First woman to win a National title in more than one major sport.  Won six National Bicycle Racing titles.  Elected May 19, 1984 at Northbrook, Illinois.  Submitted by Stephen B. Cohen.

DR. MICHAEL P. PASSARELLA  Born July 5, 1946.  Two time National Outdoor Champion in the Senior Class (1967, 1974); eleven times National Team member; Olympic team member (1968).  Set four National Outdoor records and one Can-Am Games record.  Elected May 19, 1985 at Albany, New York.  Submitted by the Amateur Skating Association of Illinois.

JOHN WURSTER  Born January 12, 1948.  National Outdoor and North American Indoor Champion in the Senior Class (1976).  Seven times National Team member; World Sprint Team member (1970); two times Olympic Team member (1968, 1972).  Set one National Outdoor and one North American record.  Elected May 19, 1985 at Albany, New York.  Submitted by Patricia A. Peaslee, Gail Brophy and Northern New York Skating Association.

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DIANNE HOLUM  Born May 19, 1951.  Peak 1972.  Olympic 500 meter silver and 1000 meter bronze medalist in 1968; 1500 meter gold and 3000 meter silver medalist in 1972.  Set record in the 1500 meter.  Member of 7 World Teams (1966-1972) winning 15 World medals.  Coach of 1976, 1980 and 1984 Olympic Teams which won 13 medals.  Coach of 8 World Teams winning over 100 medals, 13 titles and setting 7 World records.  Elected May 17, 1986 at Cleveland, Ohio.  Submitted by Mary Novak Sand and the Hall of Fame Committee.

PETE CEFALU  Born February 25, 1948.  Peak 1970.  Won 6 National Outdoor and 1 National Indoor Championships.  Set 9 National Outdoor and 2 National Indoor records.  Elected May 17, 1986 at Cleveland, Ohio.  Submitted by Lorraine Garbe and the Wisconsin Skating Association.

DANIEL J. IMMERFALL  Born December 14, 1955.  Member of the 1976, 1980, and 1984 U.S. Olympic teams.  Won numerous World Medals.  Gold medal winner at World Sprint Championships in 1973 at Oslo, Norway, at 500 meters.  Bronze medal winner at 500 meters in 1976 Olympics at Innsbruck, Austria.  Set Junior World record of 39.35 seconds at 500 meters in Italy in 1976.  Elected May 15, 1987 at Southgate, Michigan.  Submitted by the Wisconsin Skating Association.

MICHEL CONROY  Born August 28, 1951.  Won six National and North American Championships in the senior division while setting four records.  In 1974, she won the North American Indoor while setting records in the 400 and 800 meter events.  She concluded her championship career by winning the National Indoors in Champaign in 1975 and set a record at 3/4 miles.  Elected May 15, 1987 at Southgate, Michigan.  Submitted by Eastern Minnesota Skating Association.

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LEAH POULOS MUELLER  Born October 5, 1951.  Top competitor in pack style skating for eighteen years.  Won a silver medal at 1000 meters at the 1976 Olympics in Innsbruck, Austria.  Won the World Sprint Championship in 1974 and 1979.  Won silver medals at 500 and 1000 meters at the 1980 Lake Placid Olympic Games.  Won thirty medals in World competition.  Elected May 13, 1988, at Arden Hills, Minnesota.  Submitted by Linda Babl, Lorraine Garbe and the Wisconsin Skating Association.

PETER A. MUELLER  Born July 27, 1954.  An accomplished pack style skater both indoor and outdoor.  Won the gold medal at 1000 meters and set an Olympic record at the 1976 Games at Innsbruck, Austria.  First medal won at other than 500 meters since the creation of the Winter Games except for the pack style competition at the Lake Placid Games in 1932.  Elected May 13, 1988 at Arden Hills, Minnesota.  Submitted by Paul Mueller, Lorraine Garbe, Mary Sand and the Wisconsin Skating Association.

CELESTE CHLAPATY SCHULTZ  Born April 20, 1954.  Competed for 14 years in pack style skating.  National and North American Indoor Champion in 1973, and National Indoor Champion in 1976 and 1977.  Won the first World Short Track Competition in 1976 at Champaign, Illinois.  Elected May 20, 1989, at Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

ERIC ARTHUR HEIDEN  Born June 14, 1958.  Started competition in pack style skating and won the National Indoor and Outdoor Championships as a midget.  First medal in metric skating was a bronze in 1975.  Won a gold and two silvers in 1976 at the Junior Worlds and a gold at the Worlds.  In 1977, he made a sweep, never before done, by winning the Junior Worlds, the World Sprints, and the Worlds.  Won Junior Worlds in 1978 with four gold medals and won the Worlds with three gold medals.  His winning all five events and setting 4 Olympic records at the 1980 Lake Placid Olympics has never been equaled.  Elected May 20, 1989 at Milwaukee, Wisconsin.  Submitted by Mary Novak Sand and Lorraine Garbe.

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BETH HEIDEN  Born September 27, 1959.  Won the National Indoors as a midget and the National Outdoors in 1974 and 1975 as a junior.  Member of the 1976 Olympic Team as a 16 year old.  Won a bronze and a gold in 1977 at the Worlds.  Won a gold and three silvers at the World Sprint in 1978.  Swept the races at the Junior Worlds in 1978.  In 1979, she won the World Championship at The Hague by winning all four races.  Won 3000 meter bronze at 1980 Olympics.  Elected May 20, 1989, at Milwaukee, Wisconsin.  Submitted by Mary Novak Sand and Lorraine Garbe.

DIANE L. (WHITE) WYNNE  Born April 26, 1943.  Won the North American Outdoor in 1955 in her first year of competition.  Won the National Indoor as a senior in 1962, 1965 and 1966 and the National Outdoor in 1964 and 1966.  Member of the U. S. National Team 1965-68.  An intense competitor who devoted her talents and experience to coaching after her competitive days.  Elected May 19,1990 at Colorado Springs, Colorado.  Submitted by Don Anderson.

ALAN RATTRAY  Born March 19, 1955.  National Indoor Champion in 1974 and 1976 as a senior.  Won first World Short Track Competition in 1976, in Champaign, Illinois.  Gold medal winner in 500 meter at ISU Short Track Championships in 1978, placing him 3rd overall.  Elected May 19, 1990 at Colorado Springs, Colorado.  Submitted by Mary Novak Sand.

RICHARD WURSTER  Born August 27, 1942.  National Long Track Champion as a senior in 1965, 1966 and 1975, and runner-up in 1970 and 1971.  U. S. Open Long Track Champion in 1969 and 1970.  North American Long Track Champion in 1971 and 1975.  Set numerous national records at distances of 880 yards and longer.  Member of U. S. World team in 1965 and 1968 and the U. S. Olympic Team in 1968.  elected May 18, 1991, at Southgate, Michigan.  Submitted by Luke Sheremeta.

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SHEILA YOUNG OCHOWICZ  Born October 14, 1950.  National Long Track Champion as a senior in 1970 and 1971.  Gold medalist at 500 meters, silver at 1500 meters and bronze at 1000 meters at the 1976 Winter Olympics in Innsbruck, Austria.  World Sprint Champion 1973, 1975 and 1976.  World Track Cycling Sprint Champion in 1973, 1976 and 1981.  Only athlete to win World Championships in two sports the same year.  Elected May 18, 1991, at Southgate, Michigan.  Submitted by Clair Young.

SARAH DOCTER-WILLIAMS  Born May 10, 1964.  Short Track Midget National Champion  in 1975 and 1976. Long Track National Champion in 1976.  Juvenile Short Track Co-Champion in 1977.  In 1978, she won Long Track and Short Track National Championships.  On World Short Track Team in 1978 and won the 1500 and 3000 meter events along with being on the champion relay team.  Overall Junior World champion in 1981 winning three golds and setting records in each race.  Member of the 1980 Olympic Team.  Elected May 16, 1992, at St. Louis, Missouri.  Submitted by Jeff FitzRandolph.

ANNE HENNING  Born September 6, 1955.  Started skating in 1964 and was National Short Track Champion as a midget in 1967.  Juvenile National Long Track Champion in 1969.  Switched to metric skating in 1970 and was a member of the World Team.  At Helsinki in 1971, she won the 500 meter race at the World Championship.  The World Sprint Championship at Inzell in 1971 saw her winning both 500 meter events.  At Davos that year she set World records of 42.5 and 1:27.3 at 500 meters and 1000 meters.  She concluded her career in 1972 at the Sapporo Games in Japan, by winning the gold at 500 meters and a bronze at 1000 meters. Elected May 16, 1992, at St. Louis, Missouri.  Submitted by Robert R. Vehe.

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JACK WALTERS  Born January 11, 1946.  Started skating at three years of age due to the interest of his parents, who had met while skating.  He won the National Long Track and tied for the National Short Track as a Senior in 1971.  His championship career started by winning the 1957 Midget National Short Track Championship and the 1961 Junior Short Track National Championship.  Jack was the alternate member of the 1972 U. S. Olympic Speed Skating team.  He developed the coaching certification system in Canada and served as National Coach of Canada from 1978 to 1988.  Appointed Head Coach of Long Track by the Canadian Amateur Speed Skating Association.  Elected May 15, 1993 at Anaconda, Montana.  Submitted by Mary Nowak.

LYDIA STEPHANS  Born October 19, 1960.  Inspired by watching Dianne Holum and Anne Henning on television compete at the 1972 Winter Olympics, she joined the Northbrook Skating Club in Illinois.  Three years after starting, she won the 1976 National Short Track Championship as a Junior and followed with the 1978 Championship as an Intermediate.  For five years starting in 1980, she was on eight World teams in both Long Track and Short Track.  In 1982, she won the National Short Track Championship as a Senior and 1983 the North American Short Track Championship.  She was a member of the 1984 Olympic Team and the World Sprint Team.  As a member of the World Short Track Team in 1984, she won a bronze medal in two events.  Lydia served as the National Short Track Coach at the U. S. Olympic Education Center at Northern Michigan University in Marquette, Michigan for the 1985-1986 season.  She served on the USISA Board of Directors from 1984-89.  Elected May 14, 1994 at Schaumburg, Illinois.  Submitted by Tom Healy.

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PEGGY HARTRICH CLARKE  Born April 24, 1955.  Started skating at 11 years of age.  By the end of her first year, she had qualified for the National Short Track Championships.  This was the start of a 13 year competitive career.  Peggy won National Short Track title in 1973 as an Intermediate and in 1974 and 1976 as a Senior.  She was a member of World Short Track teams from 1976 through 1979 winning eight medals in individual and relay events.  Upon concluding her competitive career, Peggy helped to promote the sport at schools and the various rinks in the St. Louis area.  She coached the Clayton Speedskating Club during her competitive years and continued after her retirement.  Elected May 14,1994 at Schaumburg, Illinois.

WILLIAM T. LANIGAN  Born August 6, 1948.  He was the winner of 17 National/North American/U.S. Open Championships in Short Track and Long Track.  During 1964 through 1979, he set over 40 records in these championships.  In 1966, he began skating metric meets and over the next eight years he was a member of every National, World, CanAm, and Olympic team.  His highest achievement was in 1973 when he won the gold medal at 500 meters at the World Long Track Championships in Deventer, Holland. Skating!  Elected May 21, 1995 at Danvers, Massachusetts.

KIM KOSTRON NYQUIST  Born September 19, 1956. Kim started skating at age 5, but waited until she was 11 to compete.  After limited success in pack style Kim went to metric style after her Junior year.  Her peak year was 1977 when she won the Junior World Long Track Championship in Inzell, Germany, setting World records at 500 and 1000 meters and finishing second at 3000 and third at 1500 meters.  The same year, she won the 500 meter race at the World Sprint Championships.  Kim was a member of the 1980 U.S. Olympic Team and the World and World Sprint teams in 1979 and 1980.  Elected May 19, 1996 at Bloomington, Minnesota.

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CHUCK BURKE  Born October 8, 1930.  Chuck grew up in a skating family.  Figure skater, speed skater, and barrel jumper.  Distance skater competing in the 5000 and 10,000 meter events at the 1952 and 1956 Olympic Games.  Coached for 35 years developing 18 National and North American champions and 16 World and Olympic team members.  Elected May 18, 1997 at St. Louis, Missouri.  Submitted by Donna Burke and James Campbell.

LIZA MERRIFIELD DENNEHY  Born July 24, 1961.  Started skating at age 5. Senior Women National Long Track champion 1981, 1982, 1989, and 1991.  North American champion in 1981.  Three National records.  U.S National Team member 1980 through 1984. Active in the organization of speed skating events since 1988.  Elected May 18, 1997 at St. Louis, Missouri.  Submitted by Dennis Marquard and the Hall of Fame Committee.

MARY BLAIR POLASKI   Born February 11, 1945.  Died February 18, 2013.  Started skating at 10.  National Indoor Senior Champion in 1968 and 1981, the North American Indoor Senior Champion in 1969 and established 4 National records as a Senior.  Coach of the 1978 and 1979 World Short Track Team.  National Coach.  Elected May 17, 1998 at Wausau, Wisconsin.  Submitted by William Markland and Eleanor Blair.

MICHAEL WOODS Born May 15, 1952.  Started skating at 12. Senior National Outdoor Long Track champion in 1973.  World Championship medals in 1979–5000 meters-Silver; 1980–10,000 meters-Gold; 1984–10,000 meters-Silver.  Junior World Team 1972, World All Around Team 1974-1980 and 1984, World Sprint Team 1974 and 1977.  U.S. Olympic Team 1976, 1980, and 1984.  Competed while earning his M.D. degree.  Came back in 1984 after completing his residency.  Promoter and fund raiser.  Elected May 17 1998 at Wausau, Wisconsin.  Submitted by Lorraine Garbe and the West Allis Speedskating Club.

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ERIK HENRIKSEN Born April 8, 1958.  National and North American Outdoor Champion, Senior Men, 1979.  U.S. Sprint Champion 1982, 1983, and 1986.  Bronze medalist at the 1985 World Sprints in 500 and 1000 m.  Olympic team member 1980, 1984, and 1988.  World Sprint team member 1980 through 1988.

DAN JANSEN Born June 17, 1965.  From 1983 through 1994 one of the top speed skaters in the World.  Junior World Speed Skating Championship 1983 gold medal, 500 m.  5 gold, 5 silver, and 5 bronze medals at World Sprint Championships 1985-1994.  World Sprint champion in 1988 and 1994.  5 times World record holder at 500 and 1000 m.  Olympic team member 1984, 1988, 1992, and 1994.  Olympic gold medal at 1000 m in 1994 with an Olympic record.  Holder of over 40 individual World Cup victories.  Holder of 7 overall World Cup titles.

TOM PLANT Born November 6, 1957.  Member of World Junior Speed Skating team, 1978, World Sprint team, 1979 and 1980, World Speed Skating team, 1980, and Olympic team, 1980.  Gold medal, 500 meters, bronze, 1000 m in 1980 World Sprint Championship, silver medal in 1980 World Speed Skating Championship.

PATRICK WENTLAND: Three times National Short Track Champion and two time North American Short Track Champion, (Senior class) 1988-1993. World Team Member 1987, 1992; set a number of records and finished 4th at World Short Track Championships in Denver, CO, 1992. Eastern Regional Coach for Short Track, 1993; appointed Assistant Coach in 1997, Head Coach in 1998. Team Leader, 1998 Olympic Team.  A member of the International Coaching Committee since 1999.   Elected May 19, 2001, at Albany, New York.  Aditional Image:  Pat skating in the 1991 Nationals.

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BONNIE BLAIR CRUIKSHANK:  Born March 18, 1964.  Perhaps one of the most decorated and honored female athletes of the 20th Century, Bonnie's accomplishments are extensive.  Member of 4 U.S. Olympic Speed Skating Teams.  Winner of 5 Olympic Gold Medals between 1988 and 1994.  World Sprint Champion 1989, 1994, 1995.  19 World Sprint Medals. World Short Track Champion 1986.  Numerous honors and Awards, including:
1996 Humanitarian World of Sports Hall of Fame, 1996 Women's Sports Foundation Athlete of the Year, 1995 Jim Thorpe Special Achievement Award,  Sports Illustrated's "1994 Sportswoman of the Year", Associated Press "1994 Female Athlete of the year", USOC 1992-1994 Sports Woman of the Year, ABC Sports 1992 Athlete of the Year, CBS "1994 Woman of the Year", Winner of the 1992 James E. Sullivan Award: Nation's Top Athlete of the Year.

BRIAN ARSENEAU  Brian won the National Short Track Championship six times in the Senior Class.  Along the way, he established numerous National records at each of the distances contested: 500 meters (4 records), 777 meters (2 records), 1000 meters (3 records), 1500 meters (4 records), and 3000 meters (3 records).  Brian also set North American records at 777 meters, 1000 meters, and 1500 meters.  Brian was a member of the 1988 Olympic team; eight time World Team member (1986-1993); and three time World University Team member (1985, 1989, 1991).  Brian competed in five Olympic Festivals between 1981 and 1991 winning a total of 8 medals.  Brian served as the USISA Board of Control athlete representative between 1988 and 1992.  He was instrumental in establishing the U.S. Olympic Training Center in Marquette, Michigan in 1988.  Elected April 26, 2003 at Anaheim, CA.  Additional images: 1993; 1988, 2003

ANDY GABEL  Andy began winning National and North American Long Track and Short Track Championships as a Juvenile in 1979.  He was a member of the National Short Track Team from 1979 to 1998, the longest in U.S. Speedskating history in either Long or Short Track.  He was also a member of the National Long Track Team from 1981 to 1989.  As a member of the World Short Track Team between 1987 and 1998 Andy won over 75 international medals.  Andy is a four time Olympic Team member (1988, 1992, 1994, 1998) and holds a silver medal as a member of the 1994 5000 meter Short Track relay team.  Andy was elected to the U.S. Speedskating Board of Directors in 1994 as an athlete representative, to the Office of Vice President in 1999 and to President in 2002.  He has also served as a member of the ISU Short Track World Cup Management Commission (1998-2002), and is presently the Chairman of the ISU Short Track Technical Committee.  Andy was the Director of Figure Skating and Short Track speed skating for the 2002 Olympic Winter Games.  Elected April 26, 2003 at Anaheim, CA.  Additional images:  1988, 1998

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CATHY TURNER  A three time Olympian (1992, 1994, 1998) Cathy won individual gold medals at 500 meters in 1992 and 1994, setting an Olympic record at the distance in 1994.  She also earned a silver medal (1992) and a bronze medal (1994) as a member of the 3000 meter Short Track relay team.  These accomplishments make Cathy one of only two people to ever win gold medals in consecutive winter Olympic games and the third most decorated winter Olympian.  After winning the National Short Track Championship as an Intermediate and medalling in the ISU Championships as a member of the U.S. relay team in 1979 and just missing a spot on the 1980 Olympic team, Cathy retired from the sport.  She returned in 1988 and made World Teams in 1989, 1990, and 1991.  She retired again following the 1992 and 1994 Olympics to return each time to earn memberships on the 1994 and 1998 Olympic teams.  Cathy holds a Physical Fitness Expert certification and is the owner of Cathy Turner’s Empire Fitness Center.  She established the Cathy 4 Kids Foundation sponsoring charity golf tournaments to benefit the foundation and is a coach of the Rochester Speedskating Club.  Cathy has a B.S. Degree in computer systems from Northern Michigan University and recently became certified as a PC/Network Technician. Elected April 26, 2003 at Anaheim, CA.  Additional images: 1994 race, Racing, Gold!, With medals, doing skates.

ERIC FLAIM  A four time Olympian (1988, 1992, 1994, 1998) and holder of two silver medals (1500 meter Long Track, 1988; 5000 meter Short Track relay, 1994), Eric is the first American to medal in two different winter Olympic sports.  Eric established  World records at 1500 meters in Long Track (unofficial, 1988 Olympics) and 1500 meters Short Track (1993 World, Beijing, China).  Between 1983 and 1995 Eric won numerous Long Track and Short Track championships, including the USISA Championships (Long Track 1988, 1989, 1990, 1992, Short Track 1994, 1995), World All-Around Championship (1988), 1500 meters overall World Cup Championship (1992) and was consistently near the top year after year.  Eric retired after the 1995 season  to return and qualify as a member of the 1998 Olympic Team where he was selected flag bearer for Opening Ceremonies.  Eric has been the President of the Northeast Speedskating Association since 2000 and served as the U.S. Speedskating Short Track Program Director between 1998 and 2000.  He established the Eric Flaim Foundation in 1998 to foster the development of programs to enrich children’s lives through sport.  Eric is currently the U.S. Speedskating Eastern Regional Coach.  Elected April 26, 2003 at Anaheim, CA.  Additional images: 1988

KRISTEN TALBOT:  Kristen was an accomplished skater in both Long Track and Short Track competition.  She won her first National Short Track Championship in 1985 as a Juvenile.  She went on to win National Championships in Long Track as a Junior (1986) and a Senior (1991, 1993) and in Short Track as an Intermediate (1988, 1989).  She was a member of the Junior World Long Track Team (1989, 1990) the World Short Track Team (1989) and thee Olympic Long Track Teams (1988, 1992, 1994).  Kristen captured a Silver Medal at 500 meters as a member of the 1990 Junior World Long Track Team. Kristen was born into a Speedskating family.  Both her maternal grandparents were speed skaters as well as both her parents and her brothers.  Kristen started skating at the age of 2 and competing at 4.  Her Grandfather, Vernon Green, flooded his back yard for a skating rink for her to learn to skate and later on took her skating to  the local rinks.  Kristen has contributed in a very positive way to the sport of speed skating. She always exhibits a sense of good sportsmanship and fair play. She has always taken the time to help younger skaters and has been a good role model for them as well as a good representative for her sport. After retiring from active competition she has continued to contribute to the sport as a coach and athlete representative.  Elected April 24, 2004, at Saratoga Springs, New York

DANIEL J. CARROLL:  Dan was the U.S. premier middle and long distance skater following Bill Lanigan and preceding Eric Heiden.  His peak came in 1975 when he won two World Championship medals.  During his competitive career, Dan was a member of five World Championship teams between 1970 and 1976, five World Sprint Championship teams in this same period, and three Olympic teams (1968, 1972, and 1976).  In addition to the medals mentioned above, Dan won a World Championship medal in 1971 and achieved two top 10 overall World Championship finishes and six top 10 finishes in Olympic competition.  Dan began skating at the age of 12.  He moved into long track skating four years later.  Dan was one of the first skaters to fully embrace a year-round speed skating specific training regimen, combining dry land training, interval and long distance running, and weight training.  Following his retirement from competition in 1976, Dan began coaching for the Midway Club in St. Paul.  Dan served as the team leader for a number of U.S. skaters during the 1979 European fall on-ice training and was selected to lead several training camps for USISA, the predecessor of U.S. Speedskating, in Squaw Valley and Colorado during this period.  Dan resumed his coaching career in St. Louis in 1993 where he developed and fostered a solid year-round training program, leading at least two dry land training sessions a week during the summer months and coaching several on-ice workouts each week during the winter skating season.

NICK THOMETZ:  Elected to the Hall of Fame in 2003, Nick’s induction was delayed by a year to enable him to attend both the birth of his son Sam Christafor born April 21, 2004 and his induction ceremony.  Nick Thometz skating accomplishments are legendary.  He was a member of two Junior World teams, 2 World teams, eleven World Sprint teams and three Olympic teams, earning two overall top 10 finishes in the Junior Worlds, seven top 10 overall finishes including one second overall in the World Sprints, and achieved three top 10 finishes in Olympic competition.  In seven World Cup seasons, Nick ranked in the top 3 at 500 and 1000 meters for the 1985-86, 1986-87, and 1987-88 seasons.  During his skating career, Nick won medals in three Junior World Championship, one World Championship, five World Sprint Championships and in over 40 World Cups.  He established a World Record of 36.55 seconds for 500 meters on March 19, 1987 in Heerenveen.  Following his retirement from competition, Nick turned to coaching.  He was National Team Coach between 1993 and 1997.  He also served as the 1998 U.S. Speedskating Olympic Team Leader and Director of Long Track Speedskating events for the 2002 Winter Olympic Games in Salt Lake City.

AMY PETERSON:   Amy first began figure skating at the age of three but soon started in speedskating as well; she continued to participate in both sports until the age of 14.  Amy skated both long track and short track before eventually concentrating on short track.  Amy was a member of 16 World Teams, was U.S. Short Track Champion nine times (1993-96, 1998-2002), was a five-time Olympian (1988, 1992, 1994, 1998, and 2002) and three-time Olympic medalist (relay, silver, 1992; 500m and relay, bronze, 1994), as well as a member of the American record 3000-meter relay team (4:20.730, Salt Lake City, Utah, 2/20/02).  Amy was named as U.S. Speedskating Athlete of the Year in 1998 and 1999 and had the honor of being the U.S. flag bearer at the Opening Ceremonies at the 2002 Olympics in Salt Lake.  Amy has served on the Athlete’s Advisor Council to the USOC, as well as an Athlete Representative on the USS Board of Directors.  She turned to coaching in Spring 2002 and was named the USS Northern Regional Coach, producing 2 Junior World Team members in three years. She was named the U.S. Speedskating Development Coach of the Year in 2005 before returning to skating that year and qualifying for the 2006 World Team to compete her 16th World Short Track Championships held in Minneapolis.  Elected April 22, 2006 in Salt Lake City, Utah.

EDWARD "EDDIE" RUDOLPH  Edward "Eddie" J.  Rudolph  Son of Edward Rudolph Sr., Eddie was a member of the 1960, 1964 and 1968 Olympic teams and competed in the 1962 World competitions in Russia as the only U.S. competitor. He was the youngest male to ever make a Speed Skating Team in 1960.  In 1963, in Karasawa, Japan, he won two silver medals in the 500-meter and set a world record.  He has won the Intermediate National Short Track Championship; the Intermediate & Senior National Long Track Championship; and the Intermediate and Senior National, North American and U.S. Open Long Track Championship. Eddie coached the Broadmoor Speed Skating Club in Colorado Springs, volunteered to help in building the Colorado Springs Olympic Training Center, served as treasurer for the U.S. Olympians, Colorado Chapter, and was awarded the highest volunteer award for working with Goodwill Industries of Colorado Springs for years, with more than $1 million in pro bono activities and direct financial support.  "One thing about making an Olympic team," said Rudolph, "it does provide a spirit, commitment and the drive to succeed. It's our bond and a valuable one."  Eddie was killed in a car accident on July 19, 2009.  News Article Here.

NANCY SWIDER-PELTZ, SR. Nancy Swider-Peltz, Sr. was the first four-time U.S. Winter Olympian. She's a two-time World Record holder and has competed in eight Olympic Trials. Nancy began skating at age of 13 and skyrocketed to success shortly after. She won the Short Track Nationals at 16 and 17, the pack-style Long Track Nationals at 18 and made her first Olympic team in 1976 at 19. She set her first World Record in the 3000m that same year, and secured a second in the 10,000m in 1980. Nancy made the 1980, 1984 and 1988 Olympic Teams, the last with her one-year-old daughter, Nancy Jr., in tow. In between growing her family, Nancy continued to compete. She participated in four more Olympic Trials - 1992, 1994, 1998 and 2002 - for a total of eight Olympic Trials in four decades. At the 2002 Olympic Trials, at the age of 45, she was paired with her daughter Nancy Jr., age 14. That same year she set four personal bests and currently holds five age-group World Records. Nancy has coached five skaters to Olympic Teams since 1988 and has been the head coach of the Park Ridge Speedskating Club since 1985.

DAVID CRUIKSHANK:   David Cruikshank always wanted to play professional soccer. As a member of the Glenbrook North High School soccer team since his freshman year, Dave assumed he would play soccer in college and eventually move to Europe to compete internationally. But after he won the Men’s 500m at the 1987Junior World Speedskating Championships in Stromsund, Sweden, he decided to change the focus of his goal.
Born in Chicago on January 11, 1969, and playing hockey since the age of 7, Dave was introduced to speedskating through the Northbrook Speedskating Club, which has turned out more speedskating Olympians than any other club in the country, including Andy Gabel, Leah Poulos Mueller and Edward Rudolph. Once he realized how fast he could skate, Dave was hooked.  “We had good coaching and passionate parents,” he says. “The whole Chicago area was great. There was an incredibly strong tradition at Northbrook. I liked it and I liked the speed.”
Soon he was competing in speedskating events every weekend, learning how to race while fine-tuning his technique and strategy. After winning multiple national championships for indoor/outdoor pack style speedskating, Dave was named to the World Short Track Team in 1986 and made his first Olympic team as a long track skater in 1988.  and made his first Olympic team as a long track skater in 1988.
Dave participated in four Olympic Games, from Calgary in 1988 to Nagano in 1998, but his favorite Olympic venue was in Lillehammer, Norway in 1994. “Lillehammer was by far the best,” he says. “The Olympic Village was a little more quaint, the food was good and the rink was fantastic. All around, Norway was the best.”  He also enjoyed competing at Olympic events with his teammate and girlfriend, Bonnie Blair. They had been skating together since they were children and in 1995, Dave proposed to her at Lake Geneva.
After participating in numerous World Championships, World Cups, Olympic and national events for 16 years, Dave retired from competition and started his company, DC Hybrid Skating, LLC. This high-performance hockey training program, located in Milwaukee, Wisconsin at the Pettit National Ice Center, allows him to help athletes reach their potential.
Dave attributes speedskating with teaching him discipline, time management and how to develop a strong work ethic. He hopes the skaters coming up through the ranks today are skating for right reasons—not just to make an Olympic team or win medals.
“They need to enjoy the journey, train with urgency, and compete like every race is the Olympics,” Dave says. “If you train smart, give 100% everyday, and skate with passion good things will happen.”
Dave graduated “magna cum laude” in business management business management from Carroll College in 2003and currently serves on the US Speedskating Board of Directors as an Athlete Representative. He enjoys spending time with his wife, his daughter Blair (7) and his son Grant (9).
He is honored and excited to be chosen as an inductee into the National Speed Skating Hall of Fame and is grateful for the lessons he learned as a skater and the lessons he teaches future athletes.  “I always had the drive to know what I wanted to do,” Dave says. “It’s a great honor [to be inducted into the Hall of Fame] and I’m sure there are some people who are more deserving than I am. It’s very humbling.”  Inducted at Bethlehem, PA, on April 19, 2008.

FLOYD C. BEDBURY:   Born July 24, 1937, died March 25, 2011.  Not happy with his first pair of hockey skates as a child, Floyd Bedbury searched for something different. When he saw a set of speedskates, he knew he’d found exactly what he wanted. Although his mother thought the skates looked too dangerous, Floyd cried until she gave in and he soon became the only hockey player on speedskates.  Born on July 24, 1937 in St. Paul, MN, Floyd took to speedskating easily. As a 9-year-old, and without parental permission, he walked two miles to a speedskating event and came home with a third place medal. Six years later, Floyd was winning national events and looking forward to greater things.  He held the state Senior records for five distances in long track and two national records for short track distances. In fact, Floyd was the first person to skate a short track mile in less than three minutes. He skated with the Midway Speedskating Club for almost 30 years.
 In 1955, he earned an alternate spot on the 1956 Winter Olympic Speedskating team and decided it was time to get serious. After graduating from high school, Floyd traveled to Hamar, Norway to train with skilled coaches in order to improve his technique and form. His arrival in Hamar was terrifying and lonely as he lived on $3 a day at the Hamar Youth Hostel.
 “My mother was going nuts because I was going over there and didn’t speak the language,” Floyd says. “I thought, ‘I’ve really cooked my goose this time. What am I going to do?’”  Luckily, the U.S. Ambassador to Norway befriended Floyd, helped him adapt to the country and gave him advice. Floyd’s skating career was taking off and in 1958, the ASU sent him to compete in the World Championships in Helsinki, Finland where he ended up placing fifth in the Men’s 500m. “It was pretty awe-inspiring,” he says about his competition in Helsinki. “It was so noisy in the stadium but very exciting.”
One year later, at the 1959 World Invitational in Squaw Valley, CA, Floyd shattered the 10,000m national record which had stood for 26 years. He reduced it by 26 seconds to 17:26 and set a U.S. record for the samalog. At the same event, he set national records in the 1500m (1:14.4) and the 5000m (8:15.3). Floyd earned a spot on the 1960 and 1964 Winter Olympics Teams held in Squaw Valley and Innsbruck, Austria respectively.
Now with the Twin City Speed Skating Club (formerly Shoreview Speedskating), Floyd coaches emerging speedskaters from his home in St. Paul. He volunteers almost 230 days a year and has the opportunity to coach many quality skaters. He feels blessed to have been able to touch the lives of so many young people and hopes his coaching helped teach them, not just about skating, but about life.  “Athletes are a group of people in the world who do get along and respect each other no matter which country they are from,” Floyd says. “If the world could get along like athletes, the world would be a better place. Keep national politics out of our sports.”  His individualized coaching techniques help each skater succeed at their own level and pace. He, and his wife Janet, enjoy the energy and friendship from each skater who crosses their path.
“I’ve got the most loving group I’ve ever run with in my life,” Floyd says. “We are a team who has fun and respect for each other no matter what level. This makes us a great team.”  Inducted at Bethlehem, PA, on April 19, 2008.  Additional Photo  Additional PhotoAdditional Photo

CONNIE CARPENTER PHINNEY   It was inevitable Connie Carpenter would speedskate. Growing up in Madison, WI, near a flooded and frozen playground, she spent hours skating with her brothers and friends.
“Girls didn’t have a lot of sporting opportunities and I was always extremely active,” Connie said. “I skated every night on that rink.”
At 12, Connie joined the Madison Speedskating Club. Two years later, she was on the 1972 Olympic speedskating team, one of the youngest Olympians ever.  Coach Finn Halverson took her under his wing, preparing Connie for competitions, offering her physiological support and direction. Taking third place in the 500m at the Olympic trials, Connie was headed for Sapporo, Japan, where she finished seventh in the 1500m.
   Connie was Senior National Long Track Champion in 1976, and Senior North American Long Track Champion in 1976. She also set 3 Senior National Records, and 3 North American Senior National records.
  As a teenager, Connie didn’t advertise the fact she was a world class skater. “I missed a lot of school that year and I kept to myself,” she said. “Everyone probably thought I was a recluse or an oddball, but my biggest fear was that my peers would see me in Lycra.”  In Sapporo, Connie recalls the Olympic team was free to visit the city without any strict supervision. She said the next Olympics in Munich, Germany, where seven Israeli team members were killed, changed the Olympic environment forever.  “We were the last naïve Olympians in Sapporo,” she said. “I always wanted to go to the Olympics again and thought I was just getting started as a speedskater.”
    Unfortunately, that wasn’t to be. One week before the 1976 Olympic trials, Connie’s peroneal tendon tore, leaving her unable to skate. “I didn’t make the team and I was devastated.”  Connie turned to cycling and rowing. She holds 12 national cycling championship titles, earned four world championship medals and one world title. Connie won the first woman’s cycling event in Olympic history.  Influenced by Halverson, Connie attended University of California, Berkeley, obtaining a degree in physiology and the University of Colorado, earning a master’s degree in sports science.
Connie married Davis Phinney and they have two children, Taylor and Kelsey. Taylor competed on the U.S. Cycling team at the 2008 Beijing Olympics and Kelsey is a Nordic ski racer. Connie, born on February 26, 1957 in Madison, WI, was inducted into both the U.S. Bicycling Hall of Fame and the U.S. Olympic Hall of Fame and currently resides in Boulder, Colorado.  April 18, 2009, at St. Louis. Addional Photo  Addional Photo
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ARNOLD UHRLASS  Few athletes compete in both the Summer and the Winter Olympic Games, but Arnold Uhrlass is an exception. As a long track speedskater, Uhrlass competed at the 1960 Winter Olympics in Squaw Valley, CA, setting a national record in the 10,000m. And four years later, he competed in cycling at the Summer Games in Tokyo. Uhrlass also qualified for the 1964 Olympic speedskating team, but declined the invitation so he could stay home with his wife who was expecting their child.
    Born in Yonkers, NY on October 19, 1931, Uhrlass grew up in a family of skaters and immediately took to the ice. Skating with the Grand Street Boys Speedskating Club in New York City, he quickly made headlines winning championship events. Uhrlass was invited to skate against the country’s best speedskaters at the Race of Champions in Madison Square Garden and he won the event five times.  “I won it more than anybody else and we raced against some good skaters,” Uhrlass said. “It was a big deal. The mayor was there. I got congratulated by the mayor of New York City.”  Training was done on a more individual basis at the time, and Uhrlass worked all day as a carpenter before coming home to train for events. He and his wife Evelyn raised three children while Uhrlass followed his Olympic dream.   He turned down attending many world events knowing his training wasn’t quite up to par with the international skaters.   “We just couldn’t compete against the Europeans,” he said. “I did my training at home but nowadays it’s a different story. You can’t work today and be a good athlete.”
    Today, Uhrlass lives with his wife in Hendersonville, NC. His children all participated in speedskating while they were young and now enjoy cycling. Uhrlass was inducted into the U.S. Bicycling Hall of Fame in 1997 and the City of Yonkers Sports Hall of Fame in 1977. He is honored to be a part of the National Speed Skating Hall of Fame amidst the many talented speedskating athletes.  April 18, 2009, at St. Louis.   Addional Photo
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KATIE CLASS MARQUARD  Katie Marquard’s speedskating career was determined by her sister who joined the Midway Speedskating Club because they had better uniforms. Working with long-time club coach Bill Cushman, Katie was the youngest of seven children and the only one to make an Olympic team.  During her speedskating career, Katie was on five World Sprint and three World Allround teams, and was a five-time World Cup individual medalist. At the 1987 World Championships, she was a bronze medalist in the 500m and third overall in the 1500m World Cup rankings in 1986 and 1987.
Her skating earned her a spot on two Olympic teams: Sarajevo, Yugoslavia in 1984 and Calgary, Canada in 1988 where she competed in the 500m, 1000m and 1500m.  In Sarajevo, Katie recalls the athlete village was patrolled by security guards with machine guns, while in Calgary, everything was open and innovative. “The Calgary Oval was brand-new and it was speedskating heaven. Back then, it was the fastest ice in the world.”
    After the 1988 Olympics, Katie retired from competition, graduated from the University of Minnesota and started looking for a full-time job. Cushman, serving as US Speedskating president, persuaded Katie to apply for the USS executive director position. She got the job and for a long time USS was a one-woman show.  Operating out of the U.S. Ski offices in Park City, UT, for two years, Katie created the basis for the USS organization. After relocating to Ohio, Katie led USS for 16 years through a merger with the Amateur Speedskating Union and five Olympic Games.
    Born on March 24, 1963 in St. Paul, MN, Katie lives in Westlake, OH, with her husband Dennis and children, Nick and Abbie. She coaches the Lakewood Club with her husband, who was previously inducted into the USS Hall of Fame as a contributor to the sport, and coaches track at a local middle school.  “Speedskating has basically formed my life. Being inducted into the speedskating hall of fame is a great honor. It's nice when, at my age, my mom can still say, 'I'm proud of you, Katie.'"  Inducted on April 18, 2009, at St. Louis. Addional Photo in Medeo, USSR, 1987

MARIO TRAFELI   A native of Detroit, MI, Mario Trafeli first stepped on the ice at age 14 to try short track speedskating.  “I always loved sports, playing sports and competing in sports.  As a young teen several of my friends were taking up speedskating. They asked me to join them. It was fun and I progressed rapidly.   However, it was the discriminatory treatment that my family received as Italian Americans that motivated me to take skating to the next level.   To excel and show that Italian Americans were capable of exceeding with integrity at the highest levels of competition and achievement.” Success on the ice came quickly for Mario as he was nationally ranked by age 15.  He soon emerged as the youngest winner, first Detroiter, and first Italian American to win the North American Outdoor Speedskating Championship against the top Canadian and American skaters.  During his 12 year skating career, Mario went on to win the Michigan Indoor title six times, held many Michigan state records for various age groups, won the Silver Skates Tournament of Detroit, St Louis and Chicago.  He was the 1952 and 1954 winner of the two-mile prestigious Invitational “Race of Champions” held at Madison Square Garden in New York.  He was winner of more than 40 tournaments and set five national speed records.  With a professional career in his sights, Mario did his undergraduate studies at Wayne State University where he also played Quarterback for the Tartars. He graduated from The University of Detroit Dental School
and later served as a Navy dentist.  He skated through college and dental school and even worked in some time to skate and win the Silver Skates in Chicago in 1955 while serving in the Navy.  In 1960, Mario came out of a four-year retirement to win the Michigan Veteran’s title, where he won three of four races and set two more records. Mario then hung up his competition skates and became a State and National referee, as well as a Michigan delegate to the ASU convention for many years.  In 1982 he was inducted into the Michigan Amateur Sports Hall of Fame and also received a State of Michigan Senate Resolution for his contributions to Michigan Athletics.  In February 2010, Mario was inducted into the National Italian American Sports Hall of Fame and became their first Speedskating inductee.  Mario married his dental school sweetheart, Marjorie Busch, and together they had six children. Mario and Marjorie currently reside in Bloomfield Hills, MI.  In addition to his continued support of speedskating, Mario’s pursuits off the ice have included owning and training thoroughbred horses and golfing. At the age of 48, Mario took up the game of tennis.  In 34 years of competitive tennis, Mario has consistently held numerous top rankings including SEMTA Singles and USTA Midwest Singles Champ and is currently a member of the #1 USTA Midwest Doubles Team, age 80 and over. Mario’s love of competition, strategic playing and good knees still contribute to his winning style!  “Skating has influenced so much in my life.  I have so many great  emories.  It brought great pride to my family and to my city.  It afforded me the opportunity to travel and meet exciting people.  I am so grateful to have been a part of its history.”  Inducted on April 1, 2010 at Richmond, Virgina.  Additional photo: Mario skating    Additional Photo: Mario and Eileen Whalley

STEPHEN S. STENSON  Stephen S. Stenson has been active in sports, such as baseball, softball and golf, throughout all of his life. But the sport he was most involved and passionate about was Speedskating. Over a 20-year span, Stenson has enjoyed competing, coaching and recreational speedskating. His interest in speedskating began during World War II after receiving a pair of ice skates from his mother as a Christmas present. Stenson initially started skating with his father, uncle and cousin and later started competing in weekly races at the Brooklyn Ice Palace. Between his first race in 1956 and his final race at Saranac Lake New York in 1963 Steve won: 1957 National Indoor Champion; 1959 National Indoor Champion (tie with Dick Hunt); 1960 North American Indoor Champion; National Indoor Record, ¾ mile, Senior, 1959 (Champaign, IL)
In addition to the qualify achievements listed above, Stenson has won numerous championships and set many records. In 1956 and 1958, Stenson was the NY Silver Skates Champion. In 1958, he was also the Senior Boston Gold Skates Champion and in 1960 he was the Senior Southwest Silver Skates Champion and Senior Eastern States Outdoor Champion.
Stenson’s speedskating career paused when he assumed his duties as an officer in the U.S. Air Force in 1961. Stenson was commissioned as a Second Lieutenant in the U.S. Air Force where he was initially stationed at Plattsburgh Air Force Base. During his time stationed at the Plattsburgh Air Force Base, he continued to skate while coaching the Plattsburgh Speedskating Club for two years. He returned to racing in 1963 and won his final race was the 220 yards in Saranac, N.Y., after a two year lay off from competition due to USAF training.
“What this sport gave me personally was people who took care of me,” said Steve Stenson. “It taught me morals and ethics and pointed me in the right direction. Because of the way I was treated, my wife and I now give back to the sport by giving other people what I was given.”  Inducted April 16, 2011, at Milwaukee, WI.

CASEY FITZRANDOLPH At the age of three, Casey FitzRandolph first stepped onto the ice as a munchkin to perform in a Wizard of Oz On Ice production. At the age of four, he took up hockey, but realized that he didn’t like the amount of time that he had to spend in his hockey pads. One day during the winter of 1979-1980 he heard an ad for the Madison area All-City speed skating meet. He thought since he had tried other ice skating sports, that he would try speedskating. FitzRandolph instantly took to the sport and didn’t stop until he reached his goal of becoming an Olympic gold medalist 22 years later.
FitzRandolph had myriad accomplishments throughout his skating career. In 1997 at the World Sprint Championships he won bronze overall, and a silver medal in the 1000m. That same year, he lowered Dan Jansen’s American records in the 500m and 1000m, and bettered his own American records many times after.
In 2001 FitzRandolph won the silver medal at the World Sprint Championships, winning gold in the 500m. FitzRandolph is a six-time National Sprint Cup Champion and he achieved his childhood dream by winning the 2002 Olympic Gold medal in the 500m in Salt Lake City.
FitzRandolph established new Olympic Records in the 500m Speedskatng race at the 1998 and 2002 Olympic Games.  In Nagano, he became the first person to skate the 500m in under 36 seconds in an Olympics, and then set a new Olympic Record of 34.42 seconds at the 2002 Olympic Winter Games in Salt Lake City…a mark that is still the current Olympic Record.
“Eric Heiden was the reason I started skating, and he was the one that told me I had just won the gold in Salt Lake”  FitzRandolph said.  “It was a special moment to be told by the person that got you started that your dream of winning the gold finally came true.”
FitzRandolph is also involved in the sport off the ice.From 1995-2006 he acted as an Athletes’ Representative on the USS Board, where he was proud to create unprecedented athlete funding programs. He is also currently an active Board Member for Trek Bicycle’s non-profit “Dream Bikes”, and works as an Account Executive for M3 Insurance in Madison, Wisconsin where he helps businesses (like the Pettit Center!) with their risk management programs.  FitzRandolph also shares his experiences as an athlete through public speaking engagements. He speaks nationally about motivation and healthy living to both corporate employees and school children.
“One lesson speed skating taught me was humility,” says FitzRandolph. “As an athlete I grew up doing something I had a lot of success in, but nobody wins all of the time.  So it’s important to recognize that nobody is perfect. And no matter how fast you skate, or how many medals you win, it doesn’t make you any better than any other person.”   Inducted April 16, 2011, at Milwaukee, WI.
 
RUSTY SMITH  
Since the time Rusty first stepped on the ice at the age of 12,  he's been hooked on speed skating.  The Southern Califonria native was a natural on the ice, and was spotted by Bob Nelson of the DeMorra Speed Skating Club.  Rusty soon connected with his first coach, Jerry Search, and, as they say, the rest is history.  Rusty went on to make nine World Short Track Teams, and three Olympic Short Track Teams, skating in the 1998, 2002, and 2006 Olympic Winter Games.  He was a member of the 2001 World Champion Relay Team, and the Bronze Medal World Championship Relay Team in 2006.  Individually, he won a Bronze in the 500 meters in the 2002 World Short Track Championships.  On the Olympic Podium, Rusty captured a 500 Meter Bronze medal at the 2002 Olympic Winter Games,  and a Relay Bronze Medal with his teammates Alex Izykowski, J.P. Kepka, and Apolo Anton Ohno at the 2006 Olympic Winter Games.  During his competitive career, and since his retirement from the sport following the 2006 Games, Rusty has served as a valued ambassador for the sport of Speed Skating.  From speaking to kids on overcoming adversity, staying positive and goal setting, to taking time to help coach aspiring young Olympians on the ice, Rusty continues to make an impact on the sport of Speed Skating.  

SCOTT DREBES   A standout short track skater in the late 1970's and early 1980's,  the Champaign, IL native was recruited at the age of 9 to try the sport by legendary coach Harvey Moore.  Scott went on to become a three time winner of both the indoor and outdoor Illinois State Championships., as well as reaching four individual podiums at the 1976 World Junior Short Track Championships in Champaign, IL., and was a member 1976 Junior World Champion Relay Team.  Scott was crowned National Short Track Champion in 1981, and was a member of five World Short Track Teams (1977-1981).  Scott also set two World Records in 1978, the 1,000 Meters at the Belgium International Championships, and the 400 Meters in Scarborough, Canada.  In addition to his National and International competitions, Scott especially enjoyed participating in the Chicago Silverskates Series, where he won as a first year skating up with the Intermediate age group skaters.  

CHRIS WITTY  Christine “Chris” Witty began speedskating after seeing a flyer for a standard recreational skating event in her hometown. She laced up her brother’s skates and competed in the 500m event where she took first place, and the rest is history.  She has had an extremely successful career and is most noted for her success in the 1000m and 1500m distances.  In 1996, Chris was the World Sprint Overall Champion and won the Silver Medal in the World Single Distance 1000m. The following year she took third place in the World Sprint Overall Championships.  Although she made her first Olympic Team in 1994, it was in the 1998 Olympic Games that she made her mark by winning a Silver Medal in the 1000m and a Bronze Medal in the 1500m. That same year she placed third in the World Sprint Overall Championships and won Gold in the 1000m at the World Single Distance Championships.  A couple years later, in 2000, she continued to take the podium by placing third in the World Sprint Overall Championships and earning the Bronze medal in the World Single Distance 1000m.  Chris earned a spot on the Olympic Team again in 2002 where she won the Gold Medal in the 1000m while also breaking the World Record in that same distance. In 2006, she made her fourth Olympic Team and competed in the 500m and 1000m distances. It was at these Olympics that she had the privilege to carry the United States Flag during the Opening Ceremonies.  Not only is Chris an accomplished Speedskater, but she has also found success in Cycling. In 2000 she qualified for the Cycling Olympic Team, where she placed fifth in the 500m time-trials at the 2000 Summer Olympics. Chris became only the ninth American to ever compete in both the Summer and Winter Olympic Games.  After receiving her Bachelors degree from the US Sports Academy in sport coaching, she went on to receive her Masters in Human Movement Science from the VU University Amsterdam. Chris is currently living in Eindhoven, Netherlands, where she is working as an exercise physiologist in a sport medical clinic. She continues to be involved in speedskating by growing the sport in her community and hosting clinics from time to time.  

JOEY CHEEK  Joey first arrived on the Speedskating scene after being a successful in-line competitor for many years. After watching Dan Jansen in the 1994 Olympic Games, he decided he wanted to make the switch to ice. He made his first Olympic Team in 2002 and he captured a Bronze Medal in the 1000m distance. The following year, in 2003, he won Bronze in the 1000m and 1500m distances at the World Single Distance Championships. In 2005, he earned a spot on the podium by placing third in the World Sprint Overall Championships.  He made his second Olympic Team in 2006 where he earned a Gold Medal in the 500m and a Silver Medal in the 1000m. He was also honored to carry the United States flag for the Olympic Closing Ceremonies. In this same year, he earned first place in the World Sprint Overall Championships.  Along with his many successes on the ice, Joey graduated from Princeton University with a degree in Economics and Chinese. He is the co-founder of Team Darfur, an international coalition of athletes committed to raising awareness about the bringing an end to the crisis in Darfur, Sudan. The World Sports Humanitarian Hall of Fame honored him for his work in Darfur, he was the first recipient of the Heisman Humanitarian Award and he was also named one of Time Magazine’s 100 Most Influential People.  He is also the Founder and CEO of dailyhouse.com, a media outlet for sports that don’t always make the sports pages or TV highlights.

DAVE SILK  Dave Silk was one of America’s best distance skaters in the mid 1980’s because of his success on the domestic and international stage. He first started speedskating in the second grade in Butte, Montana because it was the “thing” to do to amongst his friends and they would go and hang out at the local rink.  Soon after he began skating, he began competing in the National Outdoor Championship as a midget in 1977 and went on to win the Junior Boys National Outdoor Championship in 1982 while also making the U.S. National Team and Can-Am Team in the same year.  He first experienced the international stage in 1983 as a member of the Junior World Team and in 1984 he qualified as a member of the Olympic team, although he didn’t compete in the Games. In 1985, he won the Silver medal in the 10000m at the World Allround Championships and in 1986 he was the World Cup 5000m overall champion and the World Cup 1500m third overall. In 1988, he made the Olympic Team and competed in the 1500m, 5000m and 10000m races along with placing first in the 1500m and third overall in the World Championships. Along with all these accomplishments, he was on the World Allround Team in 1985, 1986, 1987, 1988 and 1990.   Dave’s emergence as a great skater helped inspire the skating club in Butte to build their own rink, the United States High Altitude Sports Center, which served host to many National and International competitions and helped inspire both Minnesota and Wisconsin to upgrade their own facilities. Dave was listed in Sports Illustrated as one of Montana's 50 greatest athletes of the 20th Century. After retiring from Speedskating, he went on to the University of Washington School of Medicine and is practicing emergency medicine in Butte, Montana. He is currently developing a cycling & skating groups around Butte to keep kids active and creating and avenue to the sports if someone is interested. Dave has also volunteered with the United States High Altitude Sports Center, and is currently serving as its President and has also coached with the local club in the past.


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